The patchwork pieces

Do you also love the sound of fabric being cut? I do, it is such a soothing sound. But befor I show you the patchwork pieces of The Quilt, I first want to tell you about the difference between patchwork and quilting. I know the term ‘quilt’ is used as an umbrella term for the whole process leading to the finished ‘quilt’, but I am a stickler for using the right words, so I want to explain it at least once.

Patchwork is the assembling of small pieces of fabric in a larger whole, usually with the guide of a pattern. All the patchwork together forms what is often called the quilt top, which is in essential the quilt without stuffing and backing. Stuffing is called batting, or padding, in the quilt world and goes inside the quilt and makes it warm and cosy. Backing is the fabric that goes at the back. The quilt top, batting and backing is put together with a technique called basting, making a quilt sandwich. In a later post I will go into the particulars of the basting, because it is a technique I’ve used to process the t-shirts as well. Quilting, finally, is the sewing together of the several layers of fabric, which are usually the top, batting and backing. So, quilting is factually speaking only the second-to-last part of the whole process, after which only the border needs to be added.

So after this explanation we continue to the beautifull pieces. I know they all need to be ironed, or need ‘a press’ as it is also called, but I’ll do that when the quilt top is assembled.

Squiggly pattern

Lovely friend gave the name to this patchwork pattern. We just started doodling while I was showing her what was possible and this pattern emerged. I think it is ironical that it looks a bit mathematical, because she hates maths. We made two versions of this patchwork reversing the colours in the second version. I think this is one of the first pieces of The Quilt I actually finished and I am quite proud of them.

Colour blocking patterns

The history behind these pieces is going to remain a mystery for you all, which allows you to give your own interpretation. The only thing I can tell you is that I think they look pretty. There are two or the orange pieces and one white one.

30% cut.jpg white

Colour blocking white

30% cut

Colour blocking orange

Three variations of a star pattern

Who doesn’t love some stars in her quilts, especially because the moon will find her place as well. The patterns of these are partly from a basic quilt block book my mother has, and partly we went on the improvisation path with the basic blocks. There are three star blocks in total:

Rainbow pattern

She is a wonder of contradictions: there is the moon, there are stars and there is a rainbow. If a quilt consist of everything a woman loves, one can not deny things because of physics, unless one is making a quilt for Albert Einstein. The fabric attached to the rainbow is a piece of her dog’s scarf, so she can always be with her.

rainbow 30% cut

Rainbow piece

The English flag and the flag of Groningen

These pieces are another proof that she is a wonder of contradictions; she loves both England and the northern province of the Netherlands and considers both her home. Therefore both flags deserved a place in this quilt. Quite a fetching pair they are, if I may say so for myself.

Duck piece*

Because she loves ducks. The only thing this ducks lacks is an eye, but that will be embroidered on as soon as I have a decent drawing of it (working on it, working on it…). This duck is based on a pattern from Sesame Street found on fandomstitches.com. If you ever get the chance to ask lovely friend why she loves ducks, please do, because it is the cutest explanation you’ll ever see.

duck 30% cut

Duck pattern

Mayan fabric inspired a Maya inspired pattern

This piece is the latest addition to the patchwork family of The Big Quilt. This piece was inspired by a piece of Mayan fabric, the blue one, my friend brought home sfrom Guatemala to use in The Big Quilt.

I learned one thing designing this block, and that is that a person can overthink a design. Usually I design things pretty quickly without thinking about all the different options too much, because I like to be surprised with the end result and to trust my intuition. However, somehow with this one I became insecure and drew a lot of different options. Now I see the end result, I am glad I did, because I really like the Escher, mind boggling, look the piece has now, but it was a stressful process. In the future it would not be a bad idea to try out different desings in future projects as well, altough in that case I have to find a way to make it less stressful. The fun thing of this pattern is that it reminded my friend of Mayan patters, which fits because it is a Mayan fabric.

Another tough aspect of this piece were the fabrics. The black is from a shirt of my uncle and that is all fine. The second one is the Mayan fabric from Guatemala and I know that it is absolutely gorgeous, but the two fabrics worked together like two angry mother-in-laws during a divorce while the families never really liked each other anyway. The black shirt fabric is very closely woven and the Mayan one very loosely. Also the Mayan one frayed very easily and was much thicker. In the end I had to work very carefully to make the two work together so to speak. I am very happy with the end result, and I think it is way tidier than I could have expected. The only thing I still have to do it try to iron some of the wrinkles out.

P1110805

Mayan piece

So, my lovelies, this is all the patchwork in the quilt so far. More will be added if inspiration for the quilt strikes. Here is a picture of all the pieces that are finished so far:

nummers totaal 26-04-2017

* What Duck?

Would you like to know more?


See my DeviantArt or Instagram (username: bella.g.bear.art) for more artwork and WIPs. You can also follow my blog by clicking on the button on the left or by filling in your email address. There will be a monthly update at the end of every month and a new blogpost every Sunday or Monday.

  14 comments for “The patchwork pieces

  1. 18 June 2017 at 22:00

    I don’t know much about patchwork and quilting, but I would love to learn some day! That duck pattern looks very cute.

    Like

  2. 18 June 2017 at 22:18

    I remember having to do a patchwork quilt during high school for an assignment. It’s actually quite some work and creativity that has to run through the mind to make it a work of art x

    Like

    • 18 June 2017 at 23:03

      What a nice idea for a school assignment! And yes, it is indeed a whole process on it’s own from making the design to sewing the pieces.

      Like

  3. 18 June 2017 at 22:28

    Looks like you have been busy! I love the variations on your designs. And I’ve learnt something new about the terminology.

    Like

  4. 19 June 2017 at 15:49

    I can’t wait to see what this looks like when it’s all put together.

    Like

  5. 19 June 2017 at 21:02

    I do love that sound too – it reminds me of my mum. I can’t sew for toffee though! Kaz

    Like

    • 19 June 2017 at 22:30

      That’s a shame! But it does give you more time to enjoy other people’s work 😉

      Like

  6. 19 June 2017 at 21:40

    Aww these are lovely. You have a talent that I really don’t have!

    Like

    • 19 June 2017 at 22:31

      Thanks 🙂 I am just trying and hoping everything will turn out oke! 😀

      Like

  7. 20 June 2017 at 12:50

    Oh wow these are great! I would love to make my own blanket one day. You are very talented 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • 25 June 2017 at 11:11

      Just start making one! You’ll suprise yourself how far you get.

      Like

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