Dear Jane quilt block C-2: Streak of lightning

The Dear Jane quilt: white with shock

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Are you as white with shock as me for passing the 100 finished squares point? With big projects like this quilt, I always work without thinking of finishing and then suddenly you hit a milestone and completion becomes tangible!  I have about 60 squares to go now and the triangle border.

Squares in the Dear Jane quilt consist of a background fabric and another one. Not in every block the ratio between background and the additional fabric is the same. In this post, I’ll show you the effects those different rations have on the appearance of the block. This difference in ratios gives Dear Jane a nice lively look. The first two blocks I show in this post have a lot of white fabric, the third is about fifty-fifty and the last two use a small amount of white fabric.

Here is an introduction of this Dear Jane hand sampler quilt:

In my Dear Jane quilt, I use four background colours: red, green, blue and white. Why I chose those colours and the other colour posts you can find here:

Dear Jane quilt block C-2: Streak of lightning

What a fun name, but I am not sure I understand it for this block. But who cares. This block is made with the Y-seam technique where you wedge pieces of fabric around a corner. This block is made with the reverse applique technique.  You see that with the amount of white in this block the blue becomes the background fabric.

Dear Jane quilt block C-2: Streak of lightning
Dear Jane quilt block C-2: Streak of lightning

Dear Jane quilt D-3: Jason’s Jacks

This is a nice block: it reminds me of the shield of a knight. How cool would it be to have a quilted shield! Not very effective in the battlefield,  but most knights these days don’t see battle anyway. This block is made with the reverse applique technique. Read more about that here:

In this block, the green also turns into the background fabric instead of the white fabric.

Dear Jane quilt D-3: Jason's Jacks
Dear Jane quilt D-3: Jason’s Jacks

Dear Jane quilt E-8: Mama’s maze

This block has about a fifty-fifty dark blue and white division. The way the blocks and colours are arranged gives it a vertigo effect. Are you feeling it too? Here the white truly functions as background fabric because it serves to increase the vertigo effect of the pattern.

Dear Jane quilt E-8: Mama's maze
Dear Jane quilt E-8: Mama’s maze

Dear Jane quilt A-12: framed fancy

This block has a small amount of white fabric. Do you notice how different that looks from the first two blocks? This block is made with the paper piecing technique where you sew fabric on a background. Ideal for tiny precision sewing:

Dear Jane quilt A-12: framed fancy
Dear Jane quilt A-12: framed fancy

Dear Jane quilt A-4: Courtney’s stethoscope

The name ‘Courtney’s telescope’ makes more sense to me, because this block reminds me of the light on a lighthouse. Anyhow, I am not Courtney so I did not name this block. This block is made with the good old-fashioned patchwork quilting technique. This block also uses not much white fabric. It gives the brown fabric a chance to shine.

Dear Jane quilt A-4: Courtney's stethoscope
Dear Jane quilt A-4: Courtney’s stethoscope

Conclusion: did the shock dissipate by learning?

I hope this post gave you insight into the effect of fabric choices and how much you use of each of them. I will write more about this topic later. Some question for you:

  • Do you like to experiment with colours
  • Which creative project did you learn most from?

Would you like to know more?


See my DeviantArt or Instagram (username: bella.g.bear.art) for more artwork and WIPs. You can also follow my blog by clicking on the button on the left or by filling in your email address. There will be a monthly update at the end of every month and a new blog post every Sunday or Monday.

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